menu

Product Design

Are you a product designer working in tech? This community is for you.

Channels
Team

Freelancers, how do you work?

February 2, 2020 at 2:02pm

Freelancers, how do you work?

February 2, 2020 at 2:02pm

Hey, lovely community!

I've recently made the transition into freelancing, and I've been able to create a steady stream of projects (which I'm really proud and grateful for), however, now I'm at the point I have to turn down project I really want to take because I have one client who's taking almost all of my time, and requires me to work on-site.

How do you handle this? Do you take several projects at once, do you subcontract?

Thanks in advance for your help ❤️🙏


February 3, 2020 at 1:28am

Hi

I've worked as a contractor for the last 10+ years in various roles and now run my own business, while contracting myself out. The main thing you need to do is negotiate better with your current client. By definition you are not an employee, you are not obliged (unless it's stated in your contract) to work on-site.

Present the case that you're more efficient and productive working off-site and ask for a maximum of 1-2 days per week onsite with your current client.

Take the second project on and work hard for the first few weeks to map out exactly what you need to do on that project. Once you know what needs to be done, it's simple to find the areas where you'll need some support to achieve it.

Find a sub contractor you can trust (this is not easy, but with careful testing of those you work with can be done without risk) - try a test project of a few days (paid) and assess them on response to brief, availability and speed.

From there, adjust your weekly schedule to accomodate both projects and outsource what you can't do to the sub contractor (+30-100% of their cost as you'll be managing them - margin depends on how much you need to train them).

Good luck.

like-fill
1
  • reply
  • like

James here has given a great answer, go with that!

Edited
  • reply
  • like

February 4, 2020 at 8:32pm

Hi

I've worked as a contractor for the last 10+ years in various roles and now run my own business, while contracting myself out. The main thing you need to do is negotiate better with your current client. By definition you are not an employee, you are not obliged (unless it's stated in your contract) to work on-site.

Present the case that you're more efficient and productive working off-site and ask for a maximum of 1-2 days per week onsite with your current client.

Take the second project on and work hard for the first few weeks to map out exactly what you need to do on that project. Once you know what needs to be done, it's simple to find the areas where you'll need some support to achieve it.

Find a sub contractor you can trust (this is not easy, but with careful testing of those you work with can be done without risk) - try a test project of a few days (paid) and assess them on response to brief, availability and speed.

From there, adjust your weekly schedule to accomodate both projects and outsource what you can't do to the sub contractor (+30-100% of their cost as you'll be managing them - margin depends on how much you need to train them).

Good luck.

Wow, thank you so much

! This totally makes sense. I think it will take a bit of time, but that's very helpful looking forward. 🙏

  • reply
  • like